Allison's Lace Pages

Home Denise's Careers Denise's Resume Guest Page Genealogy Software Genealogy John E. Moss What's New? Allison's Lace Pages photogallery/photos.htm Site Map

Teach the Young
Torchon Lace
Torchon Pattern
Beginners_Sample

Allison's Lace Pages

Lace making is one of my hobbies. It reflects a family skill that reaches back at least three generations in my mother’s family. The women of that family made fine crochet lace, knitted lace, and some other needle and bobbin laces, samples of which still exist today. My mother still has her mother’s wedding waiste, decorated in rose point lace. I have yards of insertions, both of tatted and crocheted lace, and many examples of openwork, faggoting, white work embroidery, and knitted insertions, among the family items my great aunt preserved for us.

My own interest in bobbin lace has been on hold for many years while I lived in Sacramento and Washington D.C. Teachers of lace craft were few and far between. I first began knitting and learning needle arts at age five when a lady in our neighborhood would patiently sit with me and another friend, showing us hundreds of times over and over again how to make knit and purl stitches. I completed a mitten with ears and a mouse face by age six, and a plain knitted muffler as well. After that, various members in both sides of my family gave me additional schooling in techniques and I also mastered crocheting.

Within two years, I was making my own school cardigans and had self mastered the yarn overs decreases, increases, and cabling I needed for more complex projects. I made samples for a local yarn shop and did some teaching in my late teens, then started to take assignments for customers who wanted, but could not successfully knit the garment they desired.

When I moved to the San Francisco Bay Area in late 1997, I found that there were many local sources of information on lace. By that time the Internet was well underway and it also yielded further information about where and how to acquire a good teacher. I had done some lace work, and had certainly seen it done, but had not met someone who could make pillow lace. Books alone will not give you the detail about setup and tensioning that is really necessary to mastery of basic techniques. I studied with Michele Kelly at the Lace Museum (located in Sunnyvale, CA) until she took maternity leave last winter, then have continued with Louise Colgan of Fremont who is also a pleasant and competent teacher. By joining both the lace museum and the local Guild, I have met many other folks who share my interest and have been both friendly and helpful. As I gain better mastery, I will put up pictures of the homework I am doing…although none of it is good yet, it will give hope to other beginners. This is not an easily mastered craft!

Revised: 10 Feb 2008 20:47:19 -0800.

Revised: 10 Feb 2008 20:47:19 -0800.